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Questions Already Answered

# 227

Q

Shouldn’t this class be given separately for boys and girls? I’m in 7th grade but I don’t feel comfortable attending this class with the boys in our class and I sure would not want to ask a question if I didn’t understand something.

A

I can appreciate your discomfort! When we come to classes, it is by invitation, and we don't really get to choose how they are divided up. I suspect your are more mature than some of your classmates. If you have any questions following one of our classes, please ask your school counselor or school nurse. Or, feel free to post your questions to our website. If you do, I assure you we will answer them. Also, this is a website that might answer many of your questions: Teen Health for Girls.

# 224

Q

I’m a male that had unprotected oral sex in the past two weeks. I’ve noticed my penis feels inflamed sometimes. Do I have an STD?

A

There’s really no way to know without being seen by a health professional and receiving testing.

# 217

Q

I recently had sex with a girl who turned out to have Chlamydia. What do I have to do to get treated as soon as possible?

A

See someone at an after hours clinic or come to the local Health Department first thing Monday A.M No sex this weekend.

# 216

Q

Why do you preach that abstinence is what we should all do when in reality very few people follow that?

A

Abstinence is the best policy so you avoid both unwanted pregnancies and STDs/STIs. However, if you insist on having sex, there are ways to protect yourself. See Safe Sex.

# 202

Q

[Edited Wording] Question concerning having a pleasurable sexual experience.

A

These links should answer most of the questions you and your girlfriend have: Teen Sexual Health; and, Pain During Intercourse.

Remember, though, that sex outside of a mature, committed relationship can lead to unwanted pregnancy and STDs/STIs. The best way to prevent such is to not have sex. This is called abstinence. For many reasons, the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage.

Learn more about STDs/STIs at: STDs/STIs. Learn about how to have safe sex at: Safe Sex Tips.

# 201

Q

Is there anywhere I can get free birth control without a parents consent/signature??

A

Your local health department offers family planning services regardless of age or parental consent.   The healthcare provider at the health department will discuss with you the best option for a birth control method.  Please contact your local health department for more information.

Remember, pregnancy is not the only concern associated with sexual activity. Sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs), are also a risk. Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

For many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 200

Q

[Edited wording] Why do I have a short penis? I'm a 9 year old boy?

A

Your penis should develop during puberty. This link should help you: Puberty: Boys.

# 197

Q

How can a depression medicine make you have more depression? I don't understand. It's to help with it, not add more to it.

A

The brain chemistry of depression is a complex problem as is the chemistry of anti-depressants. Sometimes medication produces paradoxical results- that is opposite to what you would expect- in certain genetically predisposed people. Some natural strategies which have been shown to help treat depression include exercise such as walking, being outdoors to be part of nature, eating a plant based diet and getting 8 hours sleep every night.

It is also a good idea to discuss these issues with the doctor that prescribed your medicine.

Also, there are many different type of medication for depression and they work in different ways. If a medication isn’t working or seems to make someone feel worse, it may not be the correct medicine for him/her and the person should talk to their doctor or seek a consult with a psychiatrist or psychiatric APRN. If you need assistance in finding resources you can contact your local community mental health center.

# 195

Q

Can I call all in and get free birth control or do I need to see someone first?

A

You have to see someone first. You can either call your local health department for an appointment or just stop by. The healthcare provider at the health department will discuss with you the best option for a birth control method.  Please contact your local health department for more information.

Remember, pregnancy is not the only concern associated with sexual activity. Sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs), are also a risk. Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

For many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 190

Q

My stomache been hurting alot and ive been having morning sicknes

A

If you are sexually active, we recommend you take a home pregnancy test. You can also come to the local health department or your family physician to be evaluated. If you aren't sexually active, you should see your family doctor or your school nurse.

# 189

Q

Why do my breasts have stretch marks?

A

Stretch marks are often the result of the rapid stretching of the skin associated with rapid growth or rapid weight changes. Stretch marks in most cases may also be influenced by hormonal changes associated with puberty, pregnancy, body building etc.  

# 187

Q

How can I get over depression and anger due to paternal verbal and occasionally physical abuse?

A

It isn't reasonable to believe you can have peace if you are being abused. I recommend you speak with a school counselor about your situation so a professional intervention may take place.

Here is a website that can help with mental health issues: teen mental health. But again, abuse is never okay, so seek help from your school counselor.

# 185

Q

I have trouble reaching an orgasm. What could cause this?

A

If you are a female, this site might prove helpful: Help for Female. If you are a male: Help for a Male.

Remember, though, that the only way to avoid an unwanted pregnancy or a sexually transmitted infections if to abstain (not have sex). If abstaining is not an option then it's very important that you and your partner use a condom to reduce the risk of a pregnancy or an unwanted infection. Condoms, when used correctly, are 98% effective in preventing a pregnancy or infection. We encourage you to talk to a parent or trusted adult about having sex.

Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health. If you are determined to have sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 184

Q

Where can I get tested for stds

A

You can be tested for Sexually Transmitted Diseases/Sexually Transmitted Infections (STDs/STIs) at your local health department. Here is the link for location information for your local health department.

Also, please note that the only way to avoid a sexually transmitted infection (or an unwanted pregnancy) is to abstain (not have sex). If abstaining is not an option then it's very important that you and your partner use a condom to reduce the risk of a pregnancy or an unwanted infection. Condoms, when used correctly, are 98% effective in preventing a pregnancy or infection. We encourage you to talk to a parent or trusted adult about having sex.

Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health. If you are determined to have sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 183

Q

I'm a 12 grade guy and I'm kind of friends with this other 12 grade guy. I want to be closer with him because I don't have a lot of close friends. Many of my current friends have completely different personalities than I do but this other guy is pretty similar to how I am. We're both smart, quiet, and kind of awkward. However, I don't have his phone number, he doesn't really use his Facebook, and we're graduating soon. My question is how could I stay in contact with him without making any really awkward situations. Just walking up to him and asking for his number may seem awkward and it may look like I'm hitting on him.

A

I recommend just being honest. Tell him you'd like to stay in touch, and ask him for his contact information. True friendship is built on honesty and trust.

# 182

Q

This is a test. ~Daniel M

A

This is a response. ~Shawn C

# 181

Q

Can a teenager get therapy without a parent present?

A

At the health department we provide family planning services, STD testing, and counseling without parental consent. If you were asking about mental health or substance abuse counseling, please post a more specific question.

# 180

Q

so today i was at school and during team sports something weird happened a group of 14 to 15 year old girls walked up to me and started talking to me and i'm 11

A

As long as they weren't bullying or making fun of you, most guys would consider that to be pretty cool.

# 177

Q

What is sex stress?

A

Thank you for your question. I'm sorry, we need more information. Please clarify your question.

# 175

Q

[Edited Wording] I want to learn more about the appropriate development of the male sexual organ.

A

Here is a good link to address your concern: Your Changing Body. Also, use all the resources at: Teen Health.

# 174

Q

I'm 12 and my boyfriend is 14 we are going to have sex but we're not going to use a condom what r the chances of me getting pregnant because me getting pregnant is the last thing I want right now?

A

The only way to make sure you don't get pregnant or get an unwanted sexually transmitted infections if to abstain (not have sex). If abstaining is not an option then it's very important that you and your partner use a condom to reduce the risk of a pregnancy or an unwanted infection. Condoms, when used correctly, are 98% effective in preventing a pregnancy or infection. We encourage you to talk to a parent or trusted adult before having sex.

Remember, pregnancy is not the only concern associated with sexual activity. Sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs), are also a risk. Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health. If you are determined to have sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 172

Q

Why do I often have discharge that is either green or yellow, and it stinks really bad? I drink water and I barely drink and pop, but I tend to eat a lot of candy. Does that make it worse or what?

A

We recommend you see a medical provider. The type of discharge you are describing is abnormal and you need to be evaluated. If you need help finding a provider, call your local health department. Here is our contact information: Health Department Locations and Phone Numbers.

# 171

Q

I have bloody brown discharge for about 2 weeks around my period time. I did do oral sex 1 time but could it be STDs?

A

Small, occasional bleeding in between periods, also called break through bleeding, is normal. However, any time you have unprotected sex of any kind (oral, vaginal, anal) you are at risk for STDs. For more information or an appointment for testing, contact your local health department. Here are some links that might help you: Vaginal Discharge; Sexual Health; & STDs/STIs.

# 170

Q

[Question regarding sexual performance]

A

Assuming you are a male, this website should be helpful: WebMD: Sexual Peformance. If this question was submitted by a female, please reword and resubmit.

# 168

Q

Why do I often have discharge that is either green or yellow, and it stinks really bad? I drink water and I barely drink any pop, but I tend to eat a lot of candy. Does that make it worse or what?

A

We recommend you see a medical provider. The type of discharge you are describing is abnormal and you need to be evaluated. If you need help finding a provider, call your local health department. Here is our contact information: Health Department Locations and Phone Numbers.

# 167

Q

Is semen ever supposed to be clear?

A

Semen color and consistency can vary based on several factors, such as age, diet and frequency of ejaculation. Semen is normally a whitish, cloudy fluid. It's usually quite thick just after ejaculation, but liquefies about 20 to 30 minutes later.

Changes in the appearance of semen are usually temporary and not a health concern. However, sometimes these changes can be a sign of an underlying medical condition that requires further evaluation. If these changes persist for longer than a week or two or if the color change is associated with other symptoms such as pain, fever, sexual dysfunction or blood in the urine, see your doctor for an evaluation.

# 166

Q

Can I come in and get free birth control (preferably Mirana)? I need to do so without my mothers knowledge. And also get tested for any diseases just in case?

A

Your local health department offers family planning services regardless of age or parental consent.   Your healthcare provider will discuss with you the best option for a birth control method.  Please contact you local health department for more information.

Remember, pregnancy is not the only concern associated with sexual activity. Sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs), are also a risk. Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

For many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 164

Q

[Hidden question]

A

Thank you so much for using our site. We did receive your question and want to help you. Could you please re-word your question? We had trouble understanding what you meant.

# 163

Q

[Question regarding sexual performance]

A

Assuming you are a male, this website should be helpful: WebMD: Sexual Peformance. If this question was submitted by a female, please reword and resubmit.

# 161

Q

[Edited Wording] I want to learn more about the appropriate development of the male sexual organ.

A

Here is a good link to address your concern: Your Changing Body. Also, use all the resources at: Teen Health.

# 160

Q

[Edited wording] I've been having symptoms of pregnancy: nausea, irritability, food I like I somehow hate, food I hate I somehow I like, sleepiness, breasts are more sensitive, more sensitive sense of smell; but, I've been having sex for several days straight along with drug use. Is there a high chance that I am pregnant?

A

With almost all sexual activity there is a chance for pregnancy. You should contact your local health department and set up an appointment to have a pregnancy test as soon as possible.

Remember, pregnancy is not the only concern associated with sexual activity. Sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs), are also a risk. Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

For many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

Also of concern is your drug use. This page might provide some insights, Teens and Drugs and Alcohol.

# 159

Q

I've been having sex for a couple months and it still hurts. I thought it was supposed to stop hurting after the first time.

A

Pain during sex can be caused by a variety of factors. You should contact your primary care physician or your local health department as you will need further evaluation.

Use this link for more information: Is Sex Painful the First Time.

Also, please be mindful of sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs). Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

Finally, for many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 157

Q

[Hidden question]

A

From a teen public health perspective, we didn't see the relevance of your question. Please rephrase or clarify.

# 155

Q

Will sex hurt the first time?

A

When a woman has vaginal sex for the first time, it can be a little painful. She may bleed a little, but this isn't always the case and usually occurs because the hymen has been broken during sexual intercourse. To learn about what the hymen is and about the female reproductive system, click here, Female Reproductive System.

When a man has sex for the first time it should not be painful. To learn more about the male reproductive system, click here, Male Reproductive System.

Keep in mind, for many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to have sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

Learn more about STDs/STIs at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

# 154

Q

[Question regarding sexual performance]

A

By the way the question was worded, we're not sure if it was a male or female asking the question. Perhaps this website will be helpful: Teen Sexual Health. Otherwise, please rephrase the question.

Keep in mind, for many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to have sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

Learn more about STDs/STIs at, STDs.

# 153

Q

Should I use a condom when I'm having anal sex?

A

A condom should be used when having both anal and vaginal sex to reduce the risk of Sexually Transmitted Diseases/Infections (STDs/STIs) such as HIV, chlamydia and others. Perhaps, this site would be helpful for you, Teen Sexual Health.

For many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible STDs/STIs, the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 152

Q

[Edited wording] I have a question about sex. Is it mentally and physically healthy?

A

Assuming both partners are free of Sexually Transmitted Diseases/Infections (STDs/STIs), when sex is shared between two partners who both want to have sex and who are both mature enough to deal with the emotional issues that emerge from having sex, then sex is indeed both mentally and physically healthy.

Sex is never healthy when either partner feels pressured to do so.

Often, teens lack the emotional maturity to deal with the consequences of sex.

To learn more about STDs/STIs, click here: STDs.

Finally, for many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to have sex, please learn some ways to be safer at, Safer Sex Tips.

# 150

Q

Can you get canker sores in your mouth from oral sex?

A

Herpes simplex virus, commonly called cold sores or canker sores can be transmitted or passed from one partner to another during oral sex. To learn more, click: STD: Herpes Simplex Virus ; and: Canker vs Cold Sores .

Also, for many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. This is called abstinence. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at: Safer Sex Tips.

To learn more about STDs/STIs, click here: STDs.

To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

# 149

Q

[Edited wording] What causes throbbing pain in the male sexual organ?

A

Here is a good website that might address your concerns:
Prostate.Net.

# 148

Q

[Hidden question]

A

From a teen public health perspective, we didn't see the relevance of your question. Please rephrase or clarify.

# 147

Q

[Edited wording] Is birth control 100% effective in preventing pregnancy?

A

Abstinence is the only method that provides 100% protection against pregnancy (See also the answer to 135 below).

When used correctly:

Oral contraception (pills) are 92% effective at preventing pregnancy,

Depo provera shots are 94% effective at preventing pregnancy,

Contraceptive patches are 91% effective at preventing pregnancy,

Vaginal hormonal ring are 91% effective at preventing pregnancy,

Interuterine devices (IUDs) are 99% effective at preventing pregnancy ,

Barrier methods (condoms, spermicides, foam, diaphragm) are 70-80% effective at preventing pregnancy.

To learn more, check out Effectiveness of Family Planning Methods; or, Teen Sexual Health.

# 146

Q

[Hidden question]

A

From a teen public health perspective, we didn't see the relevance of your question. 

# 145

Q

[Hidden question]

A

From a teen public health perspective, we didn't see the relevance of your question. Please rephrase or clarify.

# 144

Q

[Edited wording] Where can I learn more about sex?

A

Here is a link that you might find helpful: Teen Sexual Health.

# 143

Q

When do you start your period?

A

You will start your period (also called menstruation) when your body is ready. Most girls start between the ages of 9 and 15. For more information regarding puberty and body changes, see When Will I Start My Period or Teen Health: All About Menstruation.

# 142

Q

If I have stinging during sex and burning and soreness feeling during sex does that mean I have a disease or can it be from having sex too much?

A

Pain or discomfort during sex is quite common and can be caused by a variety of factors: medications, skin changes, infections, lack of lubrication just to name a few common causes. If pain and discomfort continue it is wise that you see your primary care physician or contact the local health department to be seen by a health professional.

Also, for many reasons, including unwanted pregnancy and possible sex related infections (STDs or STIs), the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. This is called abstinence. If you are determined to continue having sex, please learn some ways to be safer at: Safer Sex Tips.

To learn more about STDs/STIs, click here: STDs.

To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

# 141

Q

My boyfriend and I had sex last night and he didn't pull out. I take my birth control regularly and the way I am supposed to. Should I be worried?

A

I assume you are taking oral contraceptives. Oral contraceptives are 96% effective when taken correctly. For more information you can contact your local health department for options.

Remember, pregnancy is not the only concern associated with sexual activity. Sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs), are also a risk. Learn more at, STDs. To learn more about sexual health in general, visit, Teen Sexual Health.

# 139

Q

Can stress make you lose weight?

A

While some people gain weight due to stress, for others the total opposite effect takes place. In these people stress can result in drastic weight loss. Serious ongoing stress can lead to anxiety, which can often trigger unintentional weight loss. Anxiety can lead to a loss of appetite, abdominal pains, or a feeling of fullness soon after beginning to eat, resulting in less food intake.

Those who are under a lot of stress may simply forget to eat, due to putting food as a low priority compared to other events in their lives. This leads to skipping meals and often results in weight loss. If this is the case for you it is important to see a health professional as you are at risk of developing nutritional deficiencies which can have serious consequences for your health and also increase anxiety levels.

Here are some links that might be helpful:

Unintentional Weight Loss,

Teen Health: Body.

# 138

Q

[Edited Wording] I want to learn more about the appropriate development of the male sexual organ.

A

Here is a good link to address your concern: Your Changing Body. Also, use all the resources at: Teen Health.

# 137

Q

What are some ways to cure depression?

A

You do have some control over feeling better. Staying connected to friends and family, making healthy lifestyle decisions, and keeping stress under control can all have a positive impact on your mood. Exercise is a another good way to improve mood. Get involved with friends or hobbies. Try reframing your negative thoughts into positive things in your life.

In the meantime, you might need therapy or medication to help you while you sort out your feelings. Look into your treatment options with your parents. Talk to someone you trust.

Here is a good link: Help Guide for Teenage Depression.

Eliza Clontz
The Adanta Group

# 136

Q

Hi. I'm eighteen and so is my girlfriend. She has been raped several times. She is terrified to have anything penitrating her. How do I help her with that so she can be comfortable with sex?

A

Thank you for being aware of your girlfriend’s feelings and being willing to help her.

It is important to understand that sexual violence is another person using sex as a weapon to control and hurt someone. This can have long term impact on a person who has been raped in future relationships because their sense of trust and sense of control has been taken away especially in relation to sexual relationships. You can check out this online resource for additional information: https://www.rainn.org/get-information.

We would also highly recommend that your girlfriend seek out in-person assistance from a counseling professional. There is an organization that can provide you and your girlfriend with confidential assistance and information to help both of you build a stronger relationship. The Adanta Sexual Assault Resource Center (ASARC) provides services free of charge to survivors, their family, and friends to help the healing begin. You can contact Kathrina Riley at 800-954-4782, ext. 2013. She will provide you with more information and help set up any services either of you may need or request. ASARC also provides services through a 24/7 crisis line at 800-633-5599.

Finally, to gain some insight from a public health perspective, please consider the answer to question #115.

# 135

Q

[Edited wording] When should a teen start having sex?

A

The best answer to your question is to not start having sex. This is called abstinence. For many reasons, the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage. If you are determined to have sex, be aware of the risks: unwanted pregnancy and many diseases -- sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs).

Learn more about sex related diseases at: STDs.

If you still plan on having sex, this website discusses safer ways to do so: Safer Sex Tips.

# 134

Q

[Edited wording] I want to learn more about appropriate development of the male sexual organ.

A

Here is a good link to address your concern: Your Changing Body. Also, use all the resources at: Teen Health.

# 132

Q

[Edited wording] I'm 18 and want to learn more about appropriate development of the male sexual organ.

A

Here is a good link to address your concern: Your Changing Body. Also, use all the resources at: Teen Health.

# 131

Q

How can I get a non-pill birth control without my parents knowing?

A

Adolescents and teens can be seen at their local health department for a physical exam and birth control methods without parental consent. They are several "non-pill" birth control methods available such as the Depo Provera shot, Nuva Ring (vaginal ring) and Ortho Evra patch. We also offer foams and condoms.

Remember, though, that the best way to prevent pregnancy is to not have sex. This is called abstinence. For many reasons, the best and most responsible thing to do is to save sex for a long-term, committed relationship such as marriage.

If you are determined to have sex, be aware that unwanted pregnancy is just one risk. Many diseases -- sexually transmitted diseases or infections (STDs or STIs) – can be transmitted during sex. Learn more about STDs/STIs at: STDs/STIs.

Learn about how to have safe sex at: Safe Sex Tips.

# 127

Q

Say a 17 year old girl thinks she is pregnant and she comes in to do a pregnancy test and wellness check-up, will the health department call her parents or will it be kept confidential?

A

We would not contact the parents. Under the federal Title X (10) guidelines, we are required to see teens when they seek family planning service without parental consent.

# 124

Q

My boyfriend and I have been having sex a lot lately. He doesn't use a condom, he pulls out, and he try's to be safe. Last time we had intercourse was on Sunday morning and he didn't pull out in time. I'm not on any type of birth control, I didn't use douching, or anything. I don't know what to do. What is the best idea for me to do?

A

Plan B, also known as emergency contraception, can be used up to 72 hours post intercourse. Emergency contraception can aid in preventing unintended pregnancy. This service is offered as a walk in service at your local health department.

Also, see the answer to #115 below.

# 102

Q

I think that I might have an STD! What should I do??

A

If you think you might have an STD, and you are currently involved in a sexual relationship, it is your responsibility to protect both yourself and your partner or partners from further infection. You should talk to your partner or partners about why you're worried, get tested at your local health department, and stop having sex until you know what's up.

If you are determined to have sex, start practicing safer sex; but, safer sex isn't 100% safe, particularly for diseases that spread skin to skin.

Note: You should start practicing safer sex even if you think you might have already exposed your partner to an STD. Not every disease is transmitted every time you have sex, so it is never too late to start being safe.

Tips for Having Safe Sex